Qualifications of a Turnaround Adviser

An effective turnaround adviser must be uniquely qualified to deal with crises and prepared to assume responsibility for the company’s success. The three most important background credentials for an adviser are as follows:

  • an identification with the needs of declining companies
  • specific industry expertise in your industry or a related one, and
  • a track record of overcoming adversity and making the most of poor situations

General Requirements

When evaluating possible advisers, teams should look for someone with both practical, hands-on capabilities and an educational or research-based knowledge of the issues at hand. Make sure you do not have a novice attempting on-the-job training at your expense. It would be wise to find someone who has performed at least a dozen turnarounds individually and who has access to other personnel with the same or greater levels of experience. Furthermore, familiarity with research and educational publications within your industry that highlight concepts of turnaround practice gives an adviser a more objective view of workable solutions to difficult problems.

Industry Expertise

A background in your industry prepares an adviser to face the peculiar, industry-specific dilemmas that invariably arise. Previous work with companies of various sizes and in various markets furnishes the adviser with extensive–and beneficial–exposure to your industry. A proven ability to learn new markets overnight and employ existing operating resources effectively will result in quicker turnarounds. Examine the methods the adviser used with prior clients and determine whether similar programs would make a comfortable fit for your business. “Sanitized” copies of turnaround plans produced for other clients may even be requested.

Success Rate

A turnaround adviser’s success rate with previous clients is an important statistic. Much as a baseball team manager would hesitate to hire a pinch hitter who batted below .200, the executive team must exercise caution in selecting someone to captain the turnaround team. Most advisers who have been in business for more than five years can claim a one out of two (50 percent) or greater rate of success. To reduce risk, the team should look for an adviser who can claim–and substantiate–an 80 percent or better success rate. Once a successful adviser has been located, the team shout contact references and ask what made the effort a success.

Crisis Management

Effective turnaround advisers must possess certain qualities and characteristics that uniquely prepare them to deal with crises. The first such quality is “multilevel simultaneous thinking”–the ability to solve problems on several different levels at the same time. This is a skill gained over time through both education and experience. The ability to interact with numerous employees to resolve multiple dilemmas and relate to each in an appropriate manner is also essential.

Negotiating with Opponents

A turnaround adviser’s ability to search for all the important details, address issues with a penchant for opportunism, and follow through on commitments will also further the turnaround process. Note that “opponents” emerge in turnarounds virtually overnight; they tend to be former allies such as lenders and vendors. Being able to decipher an opponent’s true bottom line and make an offer that more than covers his or her threshold yet preserves the company’s position will save the company precious time during the turnaround. Indeed, many of these opponents in negotiations will return once again as allies when the business emerges from its decline. In completing a cycle of commitments to stakeholders, the turnaround adviser should ensure that every promise made can be carried out to the letter. Such consistency in following through on promises will enhance the builder’s credibility and image in the community.

Often employing little more than intuition, a crisis-oriented adviser can anticipate pitfalls and plan around them before trouble occurs. Being able to foresee a turn of events is a rare quality to begin with, but is especially valuable when coupled with the creativity that allows the adviser to adapt the flexible strategic plan to the changing demands of the situation. This ability to adapt to change is a necessary elastic band in the adviser’s armor, without which all other tactical weapons would be useless.

 

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